GAAS member Robert Skarda to be featured on the GPB’s Georgia Traveler series

Submitted by Kelly Woodard (kelly@thesga.org)

Georgia author and member of the Greater Atlanta Archaeology Society (GAAS), Robert Skarda just finished a great on-camera interview with the film crew of the GPB’s “Georgia Traveler” series at the Scull Shoals site. Skarda preformed the full historical tour as the GPB crew taped intently.

Robert Skarda and the Scull Shoals site show will be broadcast on the GPB’s “Georgia Traveler” series April 29th at 8PM and April 30th at 7PM. The broadcast is in conjunction with Scull Shoals Festival day. This unique event is linked with the Float Georgia event which is when canoes and kayaks full of interested parties stop at the Scull Shoals site for a Georgia history rest break.

Mr. Skarda’s first history publication in 2007, Scull Shoals: The Mill Village that Vanished in Old Georgia, now in its 3rd printing, represents years of research into the past, consulting with professionals in several fields to assure that all his writing is both accurate and interesting.

— Jack T. Wynn, PhD, North Georgia College and State University

His books combine a unique background as an educator, historian, outdoorsman, and skillful writer.

—Allen Vegotsky, PhD

To learn more about Robert Skarda and his Georgia historical publications please visit the Old Oconee Books website. The author’s newest paperback, Oconee Indians: A Rich Life by the River, is a long awaited history/archaeology/story book released by Old Oconee Books in the summer of 2010.

Editor’s Note: Robert Skarda is a talented man on the go. A long-time, avid interest in the history and prehistory of the southeastern region has influenced his writings about middle Georgia. For over a decade, Robert has guided the non-profit Friends of Scull Shoals, Inc., to protect the nineteenth century Scull Shoals mill village and educate the public about rural life in that time period with informative tours through the village ruins, annual heritage festivals and an eighth grade educational curriculum supplement. Currently the group is developing a nature trail with plants representative of those in Dr. Lindsey Durham’s nineteenth century herbal medicine recipes.