Information for teachers

There are 4 articles in this category. Each excerpt below links to the full article (click on the article headline or the 'Click here to read' link!)

How do we decode the past?

Submitted by Sammy Smith (sammy@thesga.org)

Tybee_sun_with_pier_CU.jpgThe long version of this story introduces a multipage online presentation by the Smithsonian Institution called “Decoding the Past: The Work of Archaeologists” (with lesson plans). This raises issues of how to envision the past so that you can reveal patterns, rhythms, and cycles that it encompasses. French historian Fernand Braudel’s tri-partite division of the rhythms of the past are introduced.

Necessities of life

Submitted by Sammy Smith (sammy@thesga.org)

pot_well-lit_CU.jpgThe Internet provides great resources for those researching and learning about archaeology. Finding the really good stuff, however, can be difficult. Here’s some help: the Arkansas Archeological Survey has posted some really good stuff!

ArchaeoBus visits: teacher information

The Society for Georgia Archaeology’s ArchaeoBus is a Mobile Archaeology Classroom. Teachers in Clarke County, Georgia, can make reservations now for January through June of 2010. Click here for Guidelines for Educators, which includes a request form and student response form. Click here for the document Standards, Skills, Domains, and Learning Styles addressed by the […]

The ArchaeoBus is Georgia’s Mobile Archaeology Classroom

SGA_ArchaeoBus_portrait_CUGeorgia’s Mobile Archaeology Classroom—the ArchaeoBus—provides hands-on and minds-on activities to enthuse your students about learning. Archaeology is a great tool for turning on the minds of students, as well as a great motivational tool. More important, it is a discipline capable of instruction in a wide variety of skills. Archaeology is a holistic academic and intellectual approach that involves all subject areas, social skills, and conceptual skills. Georgia’s Mobile Archaeology Classroom offers the opportunity for students and teachers to leave the traditional four-walled classroom and use a new approach to learn state standards!