Resources At Risk

This wide-ranging and informative 2001 issue of Early Georgia is a primer of Georgia archaeology.

Click here to download the entire issue in PDF format (2 MB).

There are 5 articles in this category. Each excerpt below links to the full article (click on the article headline or the 'Click here to read' link!)

Get Your Copy of the 2016 Lesson Plan

Submitted by Rita Elliott

The Society for Georgia Archaeology proudly presents the 2016 lesson plan Dynamic Borders: The Archaeology of Cumberland Island, Georgia. It is the nineteenth in SGA’s series of Archaeology Month-themed lesson plans, and it offers teachers and students alike information, instruction, pictures, discussions, activities, and suggestions for additional reading and online resources. Learn more about how Georgia archaeology teaches us about the fascinating history of the Cumberland Island and St. Marys region!

Contents of Early Georgia now listed online

Researchers and the curious can now peruse the titles and authors of all articles published in Early Georgia since SGA began publishing the journal in 1950. The page with the listing is here.

Archaeology and chronology

Submitted by Sammy Smith (sammy@thesga.org)

Early Georgia logo B W 100 highArchaeologists seek to understand past ways of life. The science of archaeology is about far more than objects (aka artifacts, including arrowheads, pottery, metal scraps, and the like)—and it’s definitely not about finding treasure. Read more about the goals of archaeologists in the full story.

Back issues available

A limited number of printed copies of past issues of Early Georgia are available for order. The full story includes a downloadable order form, and a downloadable list of the contents of all issues.

Resources at Risk

Resources at Risk: Defending Georgia’s Hidden Heritage is a special issue of Early Georgia, published in May 2001. The goals of this issue were 1) to expand public perception of what archaeology is and what archaeologists do; 2) to call attention to the urgent need for the preservation and stewardship of archaeological resources, or at […]