There are 17 articles in this issue of The Profile. Each excerpt below links to the full article (click on the article headline or the 'Click here to read' link!)

The Profile issue 149, Summer 2011, now available

Issue number 149 of the SGA’s quarterly newsletter, The Profile, is now available as a downloadable and printable PDF. All stories in The Profile all were originally posted to this website.

President's messageSGA notices onlineVolunteer opportunities

President’s Message through June 2011

Submitted by Catherine Long (sgapres@thesga.org)

SGA President Catherine Long recognizes the huge efforts by the volunteers to continue the mission and vision of the SGA. She describes how volunteers made the Spring Meeting and Georgia Archaeology Month in May happen. She also mentions two upcoming opportunities to serve—CoastFest in Brunswick on October 1st, and the Georgia National Fair in Perry from October 6–16. Also, save the date for the SGA’s Fall Meeting in Athens on October 22nd.

2011 Archaeology MonthArchaeological sites to visitMuseums and Historical CentersPhoto galleries

Archaeology Month 2011 SGA meeting weekend a success

Submitted by Tammy F. Herron (tfherron@gmail.com)

2011 Archaeology Month CUThe SGA’s eighteenth annual Georgia Archaeology Awareness promotion, Archaeology Month 2011, had as its theme Gone But Not Forgotten: Rediscovering the Civil War Through Archaeology. The Governor proclaimed May Archaeology Month, at a signing attended by several SGA members. The spring meeting was held on Saturday, May 14th in McDonough. Attendees spent the day socializing and listening to several presentations. On Sunday, attendees headed to Nash Farm Battlefield and Museum, and also the Historical Museum in Heritage Park and Veterans Wall of Honor. The SGA thanks our co-sponsors and all who helped this meeting to be such a success.

Archaeology 101Archaeology in the ClassroomEarly GeorgiaPublication newsPublicationsResources At RiskSGA notices onlineSite Loss in Georgia

Contents of Early Georgia now listed online

Researchers and the curious can now peruse the titles and authors of all articles published in Early Georgia since SGA began publishing the journal in 1950. The page with the listing is here.

ArchaeoBusThe SGA news

Italy’s Rome imitates the SGA’s ArchaeoBus

The SGA is very proud of drawing upon volunteer resources, donations from generous supporters, and creative exhibit ideas, particularly from Chief Tender Rita Elliott, to create, launch, and staff our ArchaeoBus. Recently, Rita discovered that the other Rome, the one in Italy, also has an “archeobus.” The SGA, however, strongly suspects that ours came first!

2011 Archaeology MonthLesson plansThe SGA news

Get your copy of the 2011 Lesson Plan

Submitted by Tammy Herron (tfherron@gmail.com)

Reenactor camp 2011 SGA ArchaeoMo lesson plan CUThe Society for Georgia Archaeology proudly presents the 2011 Lesson Plan—“Learning Through Archaeology: Rediscovering the Civil War in Georgia.” This plan was developed based on the Georgia Archaeology Month theme—Gone But Not Forgotten: Rediscovering the Civil War Through Archaeology. The Plan explores the meaning of archaeology and reveals facts relating to the Civil War in Georgia. The featured archaeological site is Nash Farm Battlefield, in Henry County near McDonough. The largest cavalry charge in the history of Georgia happened here in 1864. Classroom activities include suggestions for making hardtack or other foods consumed by soldiers and using copies of historic Civil War photographs to consider the archaeological sites the people and material culture in the images would have left behind.

2011 Archaeology MonthSGA notices online

Governor proclaims May Georgia Archaeology Month

On May 31st, 2011, Governor Nathan Deal signed the proclamation declaring that May is Georgia Archaeology Month. Seven SGA leaders and members witnessed the signing in the Governor’s office in the Capitol in Atlanta. The Proclamation affirms the importance of Georgia’s archaeological heritage and resources, and notes that the “study, interpretation and preservation of our archaeological sites offer important educational, cultural and economic benefits to all Georgians”.

Volunteer opportunitiesWeekly Ponder

Pondering the SGA…and you

Remember that the Society for Georgia Archaeology produces this website, and is a volunteer organization. So, if you are fascinated by Georgia’s archaeology, including stories you read on this website, join the SGA! Then, volunteer to help SGA accomplish its mission and goals! And have fun with other interesting people who also care about Georgia’s archaeology.

Chapter NewsGolden Isles Archaeological Society

The GIAS May meeting: Award presented by Fred Cook for helping with Selden Project

Submitted by Patricia Bean (Golden Isles Archaeological Society)

At the GIAS meeting, Tuesday, May 3, 2011, archaeologist, Fred Cook presented Guale vs. Irene: A Comparison of Archaeological Cultures. During the meeting, Cook happily presented a plague for helping with the Selden Project in Brunswick, Georgia, over the spring to Jennifer Kennedy, her daughter, Shelby Kennedy, and to Jack Caldwell. Cook appreciated each of their help very much.

Gwinnett Archaeological Research SocietySGA notices online

GARS investigates Berkmar “mystery” site

Submitted by James D'Angelo (4drdee@bellsouth.net)

GARS_logo_CUMembers of the Gwinnett Archaeological Research Society (GARS) worked over the weekend at the Berkmar “mystery” site—this was part of the old Wynne-Russell Plantation but is now Berkmar Middle School, Gwinnett County property. GARS members plan to record the site on 14 May, and are clearing brush, etc., in preparation for doing that with Berkmar MS 8th graders.

2011 Archaeology Month2011 SpringPostersSGA notices online

Download digital version of 2011 Archaeology Month poster

2011 GA ArchaeoMonth poster CUMay is Archaeology Month in Georgia, and this year’s theme is Gone But Not Forgotten: Rediscovering the Civil War through Archaeology. SGA’s poster celebrating this theme can be downloaded by clicking here. The bibliographic references for the extensive and informative text on the back of the poster are downloadable by clicking here. Please join us at the SGA’s 2011 Spring Meeting on Saturday, May 14th, at the Henry County Chamber of Commerce to learn more about how archaeology has supplied information about the Civil War that books, letters, and other records did not.

ArchaeoBus NewsSGA notices online

ArchaeoBus visits library in Danielsville

Submitted by Tom Gresham

ArchaeoBus at Madison Co Library parked AB CUFifty-seven visitors toured the ArchaeoBus when it was parked at the Madison County Library in Danielsville on April 16th, 2011, and browsed exhibits set up in the library. The ArchaeoBus created a good bit of excitement and all who visited were impressed and appreciative. A Facebook comment later that weekend observed, “we saw tons of cool things…the ArchaeoBus was great!!!” Two kids bounding up to the library chanted ArchaeoBus! ArchaeoBus! ArchaeoBus!

2011 Archaeology MonthArchaeological sites to visitEvents informationGreater Atlanta Archaeological Society

GAAS member Robert Skarda to be featured on the GPB’s Georgia Traveler series

Submitted by Kelly Woodard (kelly@thesga.org)

Robert Skarda and the Scull Shoals site show will be broadcast on the GPB’s “Georgia Traveler” series April 29th at 8PM and April 30th at 7PM. The broadcast is in conjunction with Scull Shoals Festival day. This unique event is linked with the Float Georgia event which is when canoes and kayaks full of interested parties stop at Scull Shoals for a Georgia history rest break. Be sure to watch the program!

On the level

Melissa Webb of GSU enjoys interning at Fernbank Museum of Natural History

Submitted by Melissa Webb (Georgia State University Anthropology Department)

Melissa Webb discusses her intership experience, spring semester 2010, at Fernbank Museum of Natural History, Atlanta, Georgia. This essay is comical, honest, and realistic, as many university students do not know what to expect when they show up to intern. Melissa Webb graduated from Georgia State University with her bachelor degree January 2011. Congratulations, Melissa!

Gwinnett Archaeological Research Society

GARS members consider bricks and mortar during fieldtrip

Submitted by Jim D’Angelo (4drdee@bellsouth.net)

GARS_logo_CUDespite the rains the Gwinnett Archaeological Research Society (GARS) field trip in March 2011 to the Howard Cement Company site and vicinity was fun and profitable. The group also visited the Howard plantation site (including a mill and large earthen dam), another lime kiln site, and the Kingston museum and the Confederate cemetery in Kingston. Accompanying photos are of the remaining lime kilns at the Howard site.

Ocmulgee Archaeological Society

OAS members visit Shinholser Mound site

Submitted by Stephen A. Hammack (Stephen.Hammack.ctr@robins.af.mil)

OAS logo CUOn March 5, 2011, Ocmulgee Archaeological Society members chose the Shinholser Mounds site on the Oconee River near Milledgeville for the group’s annual winter hike. Member Dr. Bob Cramer made the arrangements with the Thompson family, which owns the site. Thompson family member Tom Wood guided the group. The OAS is very appreciative of the family’s interest in preserving this important part of Middle Georgia’s past, and wishes to thank them for the site tour and for getting to spend a wonderful rainy day along the Oconee River at Shinholser!

Events informationGreater Atlanta Archaeological Society

April 13th GAAS meeting: Smoking ritual in the Mississippian Southeast

Submitted by Dennis Blanton, Fernbank Museum of Natural History

Dennis Blanton, Native American Archaeology Curator at Fernbank Museum of Natural History, will be speaking at the Wednesday, April 13th GAAS meeting located at Fernbank Museum at 7:30pm. Please note the date has been changed from Tuesday to Wednesday the 13th. The lecture will focus on the smoking ritual in the Mississippian Southeast. Blanton’s findings demonstrate that smoking became an indispensable religious practice but that it was manipulated to accommodate shifting social conditions.